Novel Material Enables the Commercial Viability of Computers Mimicking the Human Brain.

Novel Material Enables the Commercial Viability of Computers Mimicking the Human Brain

At the KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stanford University, scientists have fabricated a new material for computer components allowing the commercial practicality of computers that has the ability to mimic the human brain. Electrochemical random access (ECRAM) memory component made with 2D titanium carbide. Image Credit: Mahiar Hamedi. Electrochemical random access (ECRAM) memory components…

Simulating Brain Synapses in Computers With 2D Materials

Researchers from KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stanford University have fabricated a material for computer components that enable the commercial viability of computers that mimic the human brain. Electrochemical random access (ECRAM) memory components made with 2D titanium carbide showed outstanding potential for complementing classical transistor technology, and contributing toward commercialization of powerful computers…

Fake login screen over a photo of a person typing on a keyboard

10 ways to make the most of your password manager

Already using a password manager? Smart move—you’ve increased your security by not relying on written reminders, spreadsheets, or other insecure forms of tracking passwords. Don’t stop there, though. To fully benefit from the magic of a password manager, you should be using as many of its features as possible. When you do, strong, random passwords…

Non-Destructive Testing of Computer Components

This article discusses the methods of non-destructive testing (NDT) applied to computer components, utilized for industrial safety and quality assurance purposes. Image Credit: Abscent Vector/Shutterstock.com What is Non-Destructive Testing? Nondestructive testing is a means of evaluating a material or component’s superficial or interior defects or mechanical conditions without compromising the component or the material’s fitness for operation. There are…

Calculating the best shapes for things to come

Maximizing the performance and efficiency of structures—everything from bridges to computer components—can be achieved by design with a new algorithm developed by researchers at the University of Michigan and Northeastern University. It’s an advancement likely to benefit a host of industries where costly and time-consuming trial-and-error testing is necessary to determine the optimal design. As…